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Monday, July 22, 2013

Expedition to Wilkes Barre - A Journey Back in Time - Wednesday, June 26, 2013

After a light breakfast, we drove to the Good Shepherd Church in downtown Wilkes Barre.  Good Shepherd had once been St. Paul's German Evangelical Lutheran Church, evident by the wording carved in stone still over the front door.  Adrienne French, the church historian, was ready for us and took us to a small room filled with filing cabinets and a large table on which she had already stacked old church record books for our perusal.  She left us alone but only after presenting each of us with a brick from the original wall of the church now undergoing renovation.  We each pulled on a pair of gloves (to protect the paper from body oils, etc.) and selected a book to begin examining.  Page after crumbling yellow page, we scanned the faded ink for familiar German names.  We had a hand scanning wand, an IPAD and two cameras on which to take photos of whatever records we could find - and WOW - did we find them!
My paternal grandmother, Mary Lentz, attended this church as did her mother, Elizabeth and her grandparents, Jacob and Anna Marie Stoebener before her.  Mary was baptized here, sang in the choir, was married here and had one of her babies baptized here.  Her siblings were also baptized and married here.  So much history!  The sermons were delivered in German by the Reverand Louis Lindenstruth and the congregation was a large and active one.

After several hours of record combing, we walked upstairs to see the sanctuary which still boasts stained glass windows from the early 1900's.  The original silver
communion vessels are in a locked viewing cabinet as is a quilt with the names of choir members, vestry and other officers of the church embroidered on it.  Looking at the underside of the quilt, we could see the name "Mrs. Lentz" emboidered next to many others.  The quilt was given by the church members as a gift to the Rev. Lindenstruth in the late 1800's  the time of my grandmothers service there.  His daughter donated the quilt to the church in  1976. 
We were in dire need of some food by now and so stopped in at a little outdoor eatery in the middle of downtown Wilkes Barre on the campus of Wilkes College. 
Then - on to some cemetery work!
Our next stop was Hollenback Cemetery....the offices here were a lot older and more deteriorated than I expected, but after all, they are over 200 years old!  We had been warned about the the grounds keeper here so we did not stop in the office but drove round and round trying to make sense of the map that had been sent to me previously by Joan Cavanaugh.  Joan is a wonderful and generous volunteer with Find a Grave and had gotten some headstone photographs for me previously.  We finally located the stones we wanted to find and others that we were surprised to find.  Unfortunately, we never located the gravesite of Anna Lentz, the first born of Wilhelm and Elizabeth Lentz.  Anna died of diptheria in 1885 at the age of nine.  Perhaps the family could not afford a marker for the young girl.
We had made arrangements to take Joan Cavanaugh to dinner to thank her for all of her hard work on our behalf and met her at 4:00pm across the street from Hollenback at a little bar and grill named "Patti's".  After ordering burgers and onion soup, we chatted as if we'd known each other forever.  Joan offered to take us grave hunting at the cemetery next to Hollenback, the Wilkes Barre City Cemetery, where Jacob and Anna Marie Stoebener found "eternal rest".  As Joan had taken their photo, she was able to quickly locate the gravestone which is in amazing condition for its' age.  She graciously took a photo of Em and I at the stone.  As far as I am aware, Jacob and Anna Marie were the first of our ancestors to arrive in the United States, having immigrated in 1851 from the Rhine Province in Bavaria.  Jacob, born in 1820 was 31 years of age.


1 comment:

  1. Happy Blogiversary!!

    Regards, Grant

    http://thestephensherwoodletters.blogspot.com

    ReplyDelete